Robert Alfred Wolff (November 29, 1920 – July 15, 2017) was an American radio and television sportscaster.

He began his professional career in 1939 on CBS in Durham, North Carolina while attending Duke University. He was the radio and TV voice of the Washington Senators from 1947 to 1960, continuing with the team when they relocated and became the Minnesota Twins in 1961. In 1962, he joined NBC-TV. In his later years, Wolff was seen and heard on News 12 Long Island, on MSG Network programming and doing sports interviews on the Steiner Sports' Memories of the Game show on the YES Network.

WIKIPEDIA

 VIDEO:

John Conte (September 15, 1915 – September 4, 2006) was a radio announcer, film and TV actor, TV host and television station owner.

Conte entered broadcasting with a job at KFAC in Los Angeles. Two years later, he had become a network announcer. He was MC for the Maxwell House program that featured Fanny Brice and Frank Morgan, and he was announcer for Silver Theater on CBS radio. One of his first regular roles was on the Burns and Allen radio show in the 1940s. His television career began as Master of Ceremonies on the 1951 late Sunday afternoon comedy hour, Star Time, co-starring Frances Langford and Lew Parker as John and Blanche Bickerson ("The Bickersons"), as well as sound-effects master stand-up comedian Reginald Gardner. His own weekly solo skit on Star Time was as an hilarious, heavily accented Italian-American chef ( in an all-white uniform, complete with huge muffin-shaped chef's hat) preparing bumbled recipes as he recited them along with frequent tangential references to "the homemade-a wine" fermenting in his bathtub visible from the kitchen. This led to a featured guest appearance with Sid Caesar on Your Show of Shows about a year later. He then hosted Matinee Theater, a live-drama series on NBC (one of the first daytime shows on network television).

VIDEO INTERVIEW: The Archive of American Television conducted an exclusive four-hour interview with John Conte just a few years ago in 1999. He discusses his early professional career in radio, his theater and motion picture appearances, and his television work. Conte describes his work as a regular on Van Camp’s Little Show, which later became known as John Conte’s Little Show. He elaborates on experiences working on Matinee Theatre, Max Liebman Presents, and his numerous television series appearances as a regular and guest actor. Conte then shares details about what it was like to found and own KMIR-TV.  Almost Five hours of an Interview where Conte talks about early radio in Los Angeles. His broadway career and how he spearheaded the development of TELEPROMPTER. more about Teleprompter

BIOGRAPHY: WIKIPEDIA

KMIR-TV owner...The station was the first to broadcast in the Coachella Valley on September 15, 1968. Airing an analog signal on UHF channel 36, it has been an NBC affiliate from the start. Actor John Conte owned the station along with the El MIRador hotel in Palm Springs, from which the call letters were derived. KMIR-TV


VIDEO: from April 14, 1942 Rexall's Parade Of Stars orchestra directed by Meredith Willson Music and Lyrics by Meredith Willson...


 VIDEO: Frank Sinatra A Voice on Air on the Columbia Legacy label of Sony Music released on November 20, 2015. The arrangement by Percy Faith is the same as on the Columbia recording. The announcer is John Conte.

RIP: Gabe Pressman, a New York TV news icon whose career spanned the evolution of the medium.


Gabriel Stanley "Gabe" Pressman (February 14, 1924 – June 23, 2017) was an American journalist who was a reporter for WNBC-TV in New York City for more than 50 years. He was one of the pioneers of United States television news and has been credited as the first reporter to have left the studio for on-the-scene "street reporting" at major events. His career spanned more than 60 years, covering events from the sinking of the Andrea Doria in 1956, to the assassinations of of JFK and Martin Luther King Jr., to the Beatles' first trip to the United States, to the attacks on the World Trade Center on 9/11. Dubbed the "Dean of New York Journalism," he won a Peabody Award and 11 Emmys over the course of his career, and was considered a New York icon. Pressman worked for various New York City newspapers after his return from Europe before becoming a reporter in 1954 for what then was NBC's radio station WNBC, and moved over to television in 1956. Pressman spent the bulk of his broadcast career with NBC, except for a period from 1972 through 1979, when he reported for what was then the Metromedia station, WNEW-TV, Channel 5. Since 1945, Pressman covered the lives of 10 New York City mayors, 10 New York State governors, 15 Senators from New York, and 13 United States Presidents. WIKIPEDIA

Ken Ackerman, quintessential Bay Area radio announcer, dies

Ken Ackerman, whose classic, stentorian radio announcer’s voice graced Bay Area airwaves for more than five decades, has died. He was 95 and died at his home in Terra Linda early Sunday of natural causes. Mr. Ackerman is best remembered as the soothing announcer on the overnight music program, “Music ’Til Dawn,” on KCBS. He joined the station in 1942, at age 20, when it was still KQW. He retired in 1982 but continued to work on KCBS on a part-time basis until 1995.

 VIDEO: One of the Broadcast Legends founders and Member of the Bay Area Radio Hall Of Fame Class of 2006, Ken Ackerman tells the story of his outstanding radio career from his beginning in radio through "Music 'Till Dawn" and KCBS News Anchor. Shot at historic KRE in Berkeley on May 25, 2010. Present were Steve Kushman, Bill Wray and Dave Billeci.

Frank Deford, NPR's Longtime Philosopher Of Sports, Dies At 78



Frank Deford, who cultivated a distinct style of sports journalism at Sports Illustrated and National Public Radio, had died. He was 78. Benjamin Franklin "Frank" Deford III (December 16, 1938 – May 28, 2017) was an American sportswriter and novelist. Over the course of four decades, he was a regular sports commentator on NPR's Morning Edition radio program (from 1980 to 2017). WIKIPEDIA

‘Pixanne’ Actress Jane Norman, Who Flew Into Philadelphian’s Hearts, Has Died


Jane Norman, who conceived the television show as "a female version of Peter Pan," played "Pixanne" from 1960 to 1969. The show was then syndicated for another seven years. Norman, a Philadelphia native, died Saturday, May 13, 2017, at her home in Bala Cynwyd. She was 83. In 1960, Norman went into WCAU with the idea for her future hit show. “Came up with the idea of the ‘Pixanne’ character who would fly because I realized all kids loved flying,” Norman said recently in an interview with the Broadcast Pioneers of Philadelphia. The was picked up almost immediately and aired for nearly a decade in the city. Norman’s Peter Pan-like character dazzled children with her realistic flying, which she said meant the world to her.

  CBS Philly

 Pioneers of Philadelphia Broadcasting Jane Norman "Pixanne":

Classical Music Radio Host June LeBell has died

Official Bio

 LeBell was a fixture at New York City’s WQXR. Hired on as the first female announcer on a major U.S. commercial classical music radio station, she hung up the mic in 2002, but returned on air in South Florida with a weekly Sunday afternoon one-hour interview program for WSMR-FM titled June LeBell’s Music Conversations. June LeBell, New York’s first woman presenter on a commercial classical station, has died of ovarian cancer on her 73rd birthday. She was frontline cultural interviewer on WQXR, conducting five to ten interviews a week. She moved later to WSMR. ad week

 VIDEO: New York broadcasting legend and Sarasota resident June LeBell talks about her music/talk show on WSMR. Video by Marty Clear, Bradenton Herald. Bradenton.com.

Ralph Votrian (1934-2017) has played in voice over roles in cartoons, TV, movies, video games and more.

Actor in radio, and TV; voiceover artist -- via legacy.com. His IMDb bio states that he began performing at age 8 (1942) on radio. His extensive list of appearances include work on "Dragnet" and "Twilight Zone." INTERVIEW IMDB

Time to save Public Broadcasting...again

On May 1, 1969, Fred Rogers, host of the (then) recently nationally syndicated children's television series, Mister Rogers' Neighborhood (named Misterogers' Neighborhood at the time), testified before the Senate Committee on Commerce Subcommittee on Communications to defend $20 million in federal funding proposed for the newly formed non-profit Corporation for Public Broadcasting, which was at risk of being reduced to $10 million. Subcommittee chairman, Senator John Pastore (D-RI), unfamiliar with Fred Rogers, is initially abrasive toward him. Over the course of Rogers' 6 minutes of testimony, Pastore's demeanor gradually transitions to one of awe and admiration as Rogers speaks.

TV legend Carl Reiner, 94, takes a tumble down the stairs

He’s fine, but Carl fell down the stairs and the first thing he thought of was his appearance that day on TBS's Conan.

His BOOK:  order "Now You're 94" here

Carl Reiner (born March 20, 1922) is an American actor, director, producer, and writer of comedy whose career spans nearly seven decades. During the early years of television comedy, from 1950 to 1957, he co-wrote and acted on Caesar's Hour and Your Show of Shows, starring comedian Sid Caesar. In the 1960s Reiner was best known as the creator, producer, writer, and actor on The Dick Van Dyke Show. He also had great success as a film director and writer, and partnered with Steve Martin in the 1970s when Reiner co-wrote and/or directed some of Martin's most successful films, including 1979's The Jerk.

  WIKIPEDIA

TV Announcer John Harlan has died...age 91.

John Henry Harlan (December 21, 1925 – February 27, 2017) was an American television announcer who worked on numerous television projects for over 40 years, particularly game and variety shows. He was from Sonoma County, California. Perhaps his best-known work was for the Bob Hope specials aired on NBC during the 1960s through the 1990s. Among game show fanciers, his most memorable outings were the versions of Name That Tune produced between 1974 and 1985. Harlan attended California State University, Fresno, graduating in 1948. Harlan died on February 27, 2017 at the age of 91.

  WIKIPEDIA

Paul Kangas, 79, Anchor Who Brought Stocks Into Living Rooms, Dies

NYTimes Obit
Paul Kangas (April 14, 1937 – February 28, 2017) was the Miami-based co-anchor of the PBS television program Nightly Business Report, a role he held from 1979, when the show was a local PBS program in Miami, through December 31, 2009. He was known for signing off each NBR broadcast with "I'm Paul Kangas, wishing all of you the best of good buys." WIKIPEDIA
VIDEO: "Best of Good byes..."

Alan Colmes Dies at 66 After 'Brief Illnes'

Alan Samuel Colmes (September 24, 1950 – February 23, 2017) was an American radio and television host, liberal political commentator for the Fox News Channel, and blogger. He was the host of The Alan Colmes Show, a nationally syndicated talk-radio show distributed by Fox News Radio that was broadcast throughout the United States on Fox News Talk on Sirius and XM. From 1996 to 2009, Colmes served as the co-host of Hannity & Colmes, a nightly political debate show on Fox News Channel. Beginning in 2015, Colmes supplied the voice of The Liberal Panel, an animatronic robot face built into a paneled wall who spouts conventionally liberal political opinions, on Fox News Channel's The Greg Gutfeld Show. Colmes began his career in stand-up comedy. He developed his radio career in the Northeast, eventually working at stations such as WABC, WNBC, WHN, WMCA and WEVD in New York, WNHC in New Haven, Connecticut, and WEZE and WZLX in Boston. His radio career took off when WABC hired him for the morning drive time slot. He was billed as "W. Alan B. Colmes," as in the station's call sign. He moved to WNBC in 1987, but his tenure there would be short when NBC announced in 1988 it would close its radio division. When WNBC went off the air for the last time on October 7, 1988, Colmes' was the last voice heard. He has been syndicated nationally, starting with his involvement with Daynet, a venture created by Colmes and other regional radio hosts. Daynet was sold to Major Networks, Inc. in 1994. Colmes kept his own show, which is distributed by Fox News Radio. He was hired by Fox News CEO Roger Ailes in 1996. He was the co-host of Hannity & Colmes, beginning with the Fox News Channel launch on October 6, 1996, and ending on January 9, 2009. WIKIPEDIA

Herb Oscar Anderson, Crooning D.J. for WABC-AM, Dies at 88

Herb Oscar Anderson, the morning D.J. for the New York Top 40 station WABC-AM during most of the 1960s, died on Sunday,29 January 2017, in Bennington, Vt., near Hoosick Falls, N.Y., where he had a home. He was 88.
  NYTimes Obit

Profile of Herb Oscar Anderson by Scott Benjamin...

 At the top of the hour, he would sing, “Hello again, here’s my best to you. Are your skies all gray? I hope they’re blue.” He said he wrote those lyrics after using Champagne Time by Lawrence Welk, which had been written by a member of the bandleader’s ensemble. He said that representatives of Welk’s show wanted to use that song as their theme and politely asked Herb if he would use another theme song.



 VIDEO: Herb Oscar Anderson was a one-of-a-kind radio personality who for the span of over six decades, entertaining millions of radio listeners. He will probably be best remembered as The Morning Mayor of NYC Radio on 77 WABC in the early 1960's.

SPORTSCASTER RETIRES....Brent Musburger (born May 26, 1939)

The January 2017 Kentucky win over Georgia was the last time you heard Brent Musburger on ESPN. The 77-year-old unexpectedly announced shortly before then that he was leaving the network where he’s worked for the last 27 years, and his formal farewell came in a relatively understated venue. But it was still a chance for everyone to say goodbye. deadspin

 Brent Woody Musburger (/ˈmʌsbɜːrɡər/; born May 26, 1939) former American sportscaster for the ESPN and ABC television networks. Formerly with CBS Sports and one of the original members of their program The NFL Today, Musburger has also covered the NBA, MLB, NCAA football and basketball, and NASCAR. Musburger has also served as a studio host for games, a play-by-play man, and halftime host. He has also performed postgame wrap-up segments and covered championship trophy presentations. He is a member of the Montana Broadcaster's Association Hall of Fame.

WIKIPEDIA VIDEO...The Best Of Brent Musburger...on the air highlights...

JIM FAGAN

Jim Fagan's baritone voice carried him through a career of voiceover announcing and sports production, has died. Fagan, 72, passed away at his home Tuesday afternoon, 17 January 2017,  from the effects of Parkinson’s disease. There’s a good chance that while you may not have recognized his face, you knew his voice. Over the years Fagan did voiceover work the NFL, the NBA, the Olympics, NBC Sports, the Mountaineer Sports Network, the MetroNews Radio Network and hundreds of commercials. WVmetroNews

 VIDEO: Former WVU football player Jim Fagan has passed away at the age of 72. Fagan spent his career doing voiceover work for the NFL, the NBA, the Olympics, NBC Sports, the Mountaineer Sports Network and hundreds of commercials. 

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