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 In my young boyhood years I was an avid radio listener with a radio-phonograph at my bedside. Enjoying Baby Snooks, the Alan Young Show and others. But the most influential was The Lone Ranger. I was captivated by the narrations of announcer FRED FOY and I knew then that radio announcing was to be my career. That series also introduced me to classical music...Rossini, Liszt, Mendelssohn themes and others were transitions and background music that I was to become familiar with in later years. (As well as meeting George W. Trendle, Jr. much later. His father created The Lone Ranger).

 As a teenager, 17 years old in this photo, I had my own radio studio in my attic bedroom in Drexel Hill, PA. With a phono oscillator microphone I was able to transmit my station through a mixer and broadcast to our kitchen radio as well a neighbor next door. "On the air" from after school around 3:30PM to 6:00PM daily. First show was a repeat tape of the Jack Paar Tonight Show monolog from Channel three TV audio. Then my DJ music show. At 5:30 the last daily show was 'dinner music'. You can see LP albums on the wall. I belonged to several record clubs.

  I was a clerk at Klein hardware store where in the evenings I would listen to music stations WFLN and WJBR (I would eventually work for both). I would tune to 610 WIP for the Dan Curtis show with music by the likes of Sinatra and Ted Heath Orchestra. Before school in the morning I would listen to Mac McGuire's "Start The Day Right" on WIP. BIO. Mac was to become a personal mentor. (my photos) I wrote a note to KYW radio about career in radio and received a phone call from PD Bob Benson to visit the station. He invited me to 'intern'  on Saturdays which continued for several years. I worked at the 1619 Walnut street, Philadelphia, studios of  Westinghouse owned KYW (WRCV when NBC owned the station). The DJs there allowed me to observe as well as file records and post news copy from teleprinters in the newsroom. Announcer Jim Lyons and KYW radio engineers, Ray Wilkie and Bud Gallow cut transcriptions for my station IDs for my home station and gave me old 12" 33 1/3 commercial ET's.  Program Director, Bob Benson, was kind enough to write a note for my application to college. Soon I was off to Emerson College radio in Boston.....the photo gallery continues

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"Hi Yo Silver..."

The most popular radio adventure show in history, The Lone Ranger held an audience of millions spellbound for over two decades. Key to its success was the music used on it-music rendered so beautifully, chosen with such delicate precision, that for half a century listeners have frantically searched for an answer to the question, "What was the music used on the Lone Ranger?" This book answers that question and many more, including, "Who performed it?" "Who recorded it?" "When?" "Where?". Set in Detroit, New York, Hollywood, and Mexico City against a backdrop of cliffhanging events that shaped the broadcasting industry, the story is as great an adventure as any heard on the show itself.The Mystery of the Masked Man's Music: A Search for the Music Used on the Lone Ranger Radio Program, 1933-1954